Install this theme

Posts tagged: illustration

smithsonianmag:

Bringing Extinct Birds Back to Life, One Cartoon at a Time

Filmmaker Ceri Levy was working on a documentary called The Bird Effect, about how our feathered friends influence our lives, when he took on a side project, organizing an exhibition, “Ghosts of Gone Birds,” at the Rochelle School in London in November 2011.

“Its purpose was to highlight the risk of extinction that is faced by many bird species in the world today,” Levy noted. “The premise of the show was to get artists to represent an extinct species of birds, and to breathe life back into it.”

Levy sent a list of nearly 200 extinct bird species to famous artists, musicians, writers and poets, inviting them to create bird-centric pieces. A cut of the profits from the sale of the artwork would go to BirdLife International’s Preventing Extinctions Programme, which aims to protect 197 critically endangered bird species.

Acclaimed poet and novelist (also, environmental activist) Margaret Atwood knitted a Great auk—a large flightless seabird last seen off of Newfoundland in 1852. Sir Peter Blake, a British pop artist who famously designed the cover of the Beatles’ album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, submitted a collage, titled “Dead as a Dodo,” which consists of a long list of extinct and endangered birds. But the most prolific contributor by far was Ralph Steadman. The British cartoonist, who illustrated the 1967 edition of Alice in Wonderland and Hunter S. Thompson’s 1971 classic Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, painted more than 100 colorful and sometimes silly birds—or “boids,” as he called them in emails to Levy. - Continue reading at Smithsonian.com.

Illustrations by Ralph Steadman

mudwerks:

(via Silver Age Comics: The Trouble With Robots)

And this is why you never build robots. Take not, Colonies of Kobol.

mudwerks:

(via Silver Age Comics: The Trouble With Robots)

And this is why you never build robots. Take not, Colonies of Kobol.

explore-blog:

Vintage science pulp fiction illustrations from the 1920s by Austrian-born American illustrator Frank R. Paul imagine our Solar System’s fellow inhabitants. 

( It’s Okay To Be Smart)

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

Folio from a Mu’nis al-Abrar fi Deqa’iq al-Ash’ar; top: The Moon and Fish; bottom: Twelve different birds in 2 registers (via Arts of the Islamic World | Folio from a Mu’nis al-Abrar fi Deqa’iq al-Ash’ar; top: The Moon and Fish; bottom: Twelve different birds in 2 registers | F1946.14)

petitcabinetdecuriosites:

Folio from a Mu’nis al-Abrar fi Deqa’iq al-Ash’ar; top: The Moon and Fish; bottom: Twelve different birds in 2 registers (via Arts of the Islamic World | Folio from a Mu’nis al-Abrar fi Deqa’iq al-Ash’ar; top: The Moon and Fish; bottom: Twelve different birds in 2 registers | F1946.14)

ryandonato:

Spanish illustrator Fernando Vincente gave a whole new meaning to the phrase, ‘seeing the world with a different eye’ by painting various images over existing cartographs and maps. He is creating animals, humans and objects out of the shape of different countries on the map. ‘When I paint I like to do on printed materials, is a way to unite my passion for topics such as anatomy, mechanics and my hobby for collecting posters, maps, atlas geographic and geographical anatomy with my work’, he states. Vincente collected his unusual canvases on flea markets in Madrid (called ‘Rastro’), in shops and antique fairs. With his series he aims to create something new and unexpected out of the common shapes.

theoddmentemporium:

There is no hair more iconic, perhaps, than Marie Antoinette’s elaborately curled and beribboned wigs. Her daringly avant-garde style and her love of fashion took Versailles by storm, and the ladies of court were constantly trying to emulate the Queen’s frequently changing coiffure. As young aristocrats in the 18th Century, women (although in a position of social power) were obviously not in a position to express themselves freely or assertively. Perhaps the young Queen of France used her love of fashion as a way of expressing herself when in all other areas (marriage, politics) she was rather a lost soul. One of the most well known trends of this period was for miniature models of war ships to be placed upon rolling waves of curls, in celebration of French Navy victories against the British.

theoddmentemporium:

There is no hair more iconic, perhaps, than Marie Antoinette’s elaborately curled and beribboned wigs. Her daringly avant-garde style and her love of fashion took Versailles by storm, and the ladies of court were constantly trying to emulate the Queen’s frequently changing coiffure. As young aristocrats in the 18th Century, women (although in a position of social power) were obviously not in a position to express themselves freely or assertively. Perhaps the young Queen of France used her love of fashion as a way of expressing herself when in all other areas (marriage, politics) she was rather a lost soul. One of the most well known trends of this period was for miniature models of war ships to be placed upon rolling waves of curls, in celebration of French Navy victories against the British.

apothecarium-aromatica:

Cananga ordarata (Common name: Ylang ylang)

apothecarium-aromatica:

Cananga ordarata (Common name: Ylang ylang)

monsterman:


HEMBRAS PELIGROSAS #20


(via trixietreats)
Oh, clawed hands, no.
I judging you too, voyeuristic bats.

monsterman:

HEMBRAS PELIGROSAS #20

(via trixietreats)

Oh, clawed hands, no.

I judging you too, voyeuristic bats.